Why Every Pear is Beyond Compare 

The humble, shapely, pear is a member of the rosaceae family (interestingly, just like roses as well as apples, and apricots (to name a few).

When you look into the nutritional components of the pear, the thing that jumps out is its fiber profile. Did you know that you can get 22% of your daily fiber needs met by eating one?!  How crazy is that?!  Which explains why it’s beneficial to digestive health, as well as prebiotic functions.

Otherwise, compared to other fruits, let’s face it: they don’t look terribly spectacular at first glance.

Stripping Down the Pear
Juicing 8oz of its juice provides the nutrition you’d get by eating two or three. For people like me with digestive issues (specifically for me, Chrons’ Disease) dodging the fiber lets us take in the pear’s free form concentrate of power-packed minerals, including: vitamins C & K along with several forms of synergistic B, potassium, copper, phosphorus, magnesium, flavonols (anthocyanins), and iron.

Also interestingly, its juice improves the absorbability of many other vitamins and mineral. That’s one of the reasons pear juice is recommended for children, as well as for anyone recovering from illness.

That’s why we sometimes refer to pears as a natural immune system booster!

In addition, a pear’s nutrients boost cardiovascular circulation, pears’ flavonoids are being studied for their ability to prevent cancer. They also increase bone mineral density, and support the entire nervous system.

CRITICALLY: This happens in the Juice far more readily then merely munching on them whole, when the pear’s fiber prevents nutrient absorption.

 Ap(pear)ent Fun Facts
Despite the fact that the Ancient Greeks mathematically calculated the shape (and size) of the earth thousands of years before his charter from Queen Isabella – Columbus believed, rather, that the Earth is in fact shaped like a pear! Columbus wrote: ” […] this western half of the world, I maintain, is like half a very round pear, having a raised projection for the stalk, as I have already described” [1].

And, They Have Great A-peel

While we often hear about apples being rich in pectin, pears are actually a better source. Pectin fiber is helpful for digestion by binding to excess fatty substances in our lower GI tract, and removes these fatty substances along with LDL cholesterol and other waste toxins in the body.

Pear pectin literally encourages the body to dump its garbage, improving our natural detoxifying capabilities, while also helping to balance our blood sugar. The pectin is found in the highest levels in the peel, and has been shown in studies to improve plasma lipid levels. So if you juice at home (and, I hope you do) – juice the ‘Juice Shack way’ … juice the whole thing!

Come on down into the Shack, where we’ve pre-peared a juice for you!

Sources:
Excerpt: Book of Earths by Edna Kenton (1928) pp. 209-210 on comparative folklore and mythology of earth origins. Including FIGURE 89. The pear-shaped Earth of Columbus. (From Paradise Found; William Fairfield Warren, 1885.)

  1. https://draxe.com/pear-nutrition/
  2. https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/fruit/pears.html
  3. http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=28
  4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4657810/
  5. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/20109132/
  6. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/12620529/
  7. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/285430.php
  8. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12952433
  9. http://ijrap.net/admin/php/uploads/1473_pdf.pdf
  10. http://olharfeliz.typepad.com/files/antioxidant-fruits-march%C3%A9-indien.pdf